Colombian Street Food

9
209
Arepa con queso y lecheria.  So far, I've only seen the condensed milk drizzled on top in Medellin.  I picked up this particular arepa in Jardin Botanico.
Arepa con queso y lecheria. So far, I’ve only seen the condensed milk drizzled on top in Medellin. I picked up this particular arepa in Jardin Botanico.

Colombian street food is heavy on the calories, salt, and fat, however there is something for everyone.

Fresh fruits can keep you cool, while the richness of arepas with cheese and butter can quickly become addictive.

Barbecued corn on the cob is a popular snack, and you'll see vendors selling it everywhere, from outside the soccer stadium to the streets and parks.
Barbecued corn on the cob is a popular snack, and you’ll see vendors selling it everywhere, from outside the soccer stadium to the streets and parks.
Hot dogs in Colombia are by default smothered with several sauces (salsas), including ketchup, mustard, and mayo.  This makes for a colorful presentation, however they tend to be a lot messier to eat then in the USA where you're in more control of adding the toppings.
Hot dogs in Colombia are by default smothered with several sauces (salsas), including ketchup, mustard, and mayo. This makes for a colorful presentation, however they tend to be a lot messier to eat then in the USA where you’re in more control of adding the toppings.
Chicken, meat, potatoes and salad make up the typical plate of street food in Colombia.  You'll find these combinations at every festival, parade and street party.
Chicken, meat, potatoes and salad make up the typical plate of street food in Colombia. You’ll find these combinations at every festival, parade and street party.
Fresh fruits such as watermelon and mango offer a refreshing break from the greasier, saltier hot foods.
Fresh fruits such as watermelon and mango offer a refreshing break from the greasier, saltier hot foods.
These deep fried dough rings are the equivalent of doughnuts in the USA.
These deep fried dough rings are the equivalent of doughnuts in the USA.
Cold beer and Aguardiente are staples of the Colombian street party culture. During festivals, a cooler full of both are never more than arm's reach away.
Cold beer and Aguardiente are staples of the Colombian street party culture. During festivals, a cooler full of both are never more than arm’s reach away.
Colombians love their pork skin, served here with potatoes, lime, and salad.
Colombians love their pork skin, served here with potatoes, lime, and salad.
A large slab of meat cooks on the street.
A large slab of meat cooks on the street.
Empanadas are everywhere. Some shops, like this one in Cali's barrio San Antonio, leave a basket of them out for people to serve themselves. They are usually offered with meet, chicken, or potatoes.
Empanadas are everywhere. Some shops, like this one in Cali’s barrio San Antonio, leave a basket of them out for people to serve themselves. They are usually offered with meet, chicken, or potatoes.
In Guatape, my friend Troy dared me to eat Chunchullo (intestines), a popular snack food.  I chewed and chewed, but couldn't swallow the intestinal bits.  I later learned that they hadn't been cooked long enough, which is why they had the consistency of rubber.  I didn't care for the taste either.
In Guatape, my friend Troy dared me to eat Chunchullo (intestines), a popular snack food. I chewed and chewed, but couldn’t swallow the intestinal bits. I later learned that they hadn’t been cooked long enough, which is why they had the consistency of rubber. I didn’t care for the taste either.
Like the story? Take a second to support Medellin Living on Patreon!

LEAVE A REPLY

9 COMMENTS

  1. Yum I wanna eat that arepa right now!

    That taste of that corn on the street really surprised me… it’s a lot tougher and not as sweet as regular corn.

  2. Hey David, thanks for your blog. I’m a snowbird (NYC and So FL) who is thinking of spending next season (Nov-Apr) in Medellin. i’ll be 60 next month,…still active, but back condition limits a lot of dancing. Love the outdoors and the weather is the most important thing. Do you think I’ll be able to make friends of other baby-boomers? Do you run into baby-boomers from the States or other Westernized countries? My Spanish is pretty good and getting better,….maybe I’ll even look for a younger (not too young) woman. Good luck to you, Michael

    • Hola Michael,

      Yes, I’ve run into some baby boomers here in Medellin, but I tend to spend most of my time with the travel bloggers that pass through town, and generally they’re (though not all) in their 20’s and early 30’s. I’ve found it very easy to make friends here, and the better your Spanish, the easier it will be to build relationships with the Colombian women.

  3. I agree that the nitpick laws in the US, like ‘open container’ are idiotic and unnecessary! That’s one of the few ‘freedoms’ which makes travelling to other locales around the world interesting and fun! Hell, when I was living in Mexico besides fresh tortillas with mantequilla (butter) and coffee being customarily offered when visiting friends, homemade tequila was also offered and it would be considered rude to refuse it. That was some of the best tequila I have ever tasted and have not since found any equal to it here in the States! Definitely something I really miss besides all the delicious food! Mexico is quite a special place once you get away from the frontera (border) or the tourist traps, where you also see more of the cartel related violence.